Everyone knows the classic Sydney icons – The Sydney Opera House, the Sydney Harbour Bridge, The Rocks, Circular Quay and the amazing city skyline.

They’re spectacular subjects that are instantly recognisable and are certainly attractions to be proud of. Here at V-Mark Design we like to get off the beaten track to find some of Sydney’s less known sights.

GEORGE STREET

Not really a hidden gem but definitely a must-see, George Street is in fact Australia’s oldest street and was known as High Street until 1910. Centrally located, George Street offers access to a number of attractions including Circular Quay, Sydney Opera House, Chinatown, The Rocks and Martin Place. As would be expected in Australia’s oldest street, George Street is home to some of Sydney’s most impressive architecture. The Sydney Town Hall, Sydney Central Railway Station, the Queen Victoria Building and St Andrew’s Cathedral.

CENTRAL PARK

In 1835 Kent Brewery was built on the site that would later become Central Park. Central Park is located in the inner Sydney suburb of Chippendale and has undergone a significant renewal over the last decade. Home to two parks, impressive artwork, residential apartments, Central Park Mall and the award-winning One Central Park Tower, Central Park offers many leisure, shopping and dining options. The Brewery continues to be restored to its former glory and is an attraction worth visiting all on its own.

PADDINGTON RESERVOIR GARDENS

The Paddington Reservoir Gardens are located on the site of the former working reservoir which provided water to Sydney’s inner suburbs from 1866 until 1899 when it became home to the Water Board Workshop and storage area. The reservoir was designed by Edward Bell and boasted grand archways, cavernous chambers and cast-iron beams. In recent times the former reservoir has been turned into a lovely sunken garden that allows visitors to enjoy the tranquillity of the gardens while taking in the impressive architecture of the reservoir.

THE GAP

Looking out over the Tasman Sea, The Gap is a sandstone cliff with a wavecut shelf located below. The Gap is located in the Sydney suburb of Watsons Bay and which is the first landing spot of Governor Phillip. A signalling station was developed at the site in 1870 and in 1871 the area around The Gap was developed into a military garrison. These days The Gap is accessible by public transport, offers walking trails and a café as well as spectacular views and the enormous sound of the waves crashing below.

These are some of our favourite hidden gems. Don’t forget to bring your camera!